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Lawtomatic Newsletter Issue, #157

By Gabe Teninbaum


My name is Gabe Teninbaum (on Twitter at @GTeninbaum).  I'm a professor, as well as the Assistant Dean for Innovation, Strategic Initiatives, & Distance Education, at Suffolk Law in Boston. I'm also a Visiting Fellow at Yale Law School's Information Society Project My work focuses on legal innovation, technology, and the changing business of law. Every day, I digest tons of content on these topics. The goal of this newsletter is to curate the most interesting, valuable, and thought-provoking of these ideas and share them with you. 


If you like reading it, please subscribe. You're also invited to forward this to others who you think would benefit. Likewise, please email me with feedback, ideas, and tips so I can deliver what's most valuable to you.

 

The Appetizer: Sponsors

  • SpacedRepetition.com is a tool to help law students & bar preppers learn more using cutting-edge science. Called the single most effective technique to learn by the American Psychological Association. More than 20,000 users spread across every law school in the U.S.​

The Main Course: 5 Things That Made Me Think This Week​

  • 40 Futures: I'm a sucker for speculative fiction, especially when it comes to speculative legal fiction. That's why I've become a huge fan of Jason Tashea's audio series (with transcripts of the story included), 40 Futures. One nice touch is that, after sharing the story, Jason includes links to the articles and/or research that suggest the possibility of the scenarios he created. You can sign-up/preview it by going to the Justice Tech Download substack and clicking to join/read first.

  • ABA Women of Legal Tech, 2022: it's exciting to see some of the most interesting people in legal tech, who also are women, recognized each year by the ABA. I was particularly excited this year to see my colleague, Prof. Dyane O'Leary, listed among the winners. I also like that they publish winners' Twitter handles so you can follow their ideas from day to day.

  • Paladin Raises $8m from Mark Cuban-backed Fund: Led by CEO Kristin Sonday, Paladin helps law firms and in-house legal counsels streamline, source and track their pro bono work. It has created a central dashboard where lawyers can discover new pro bono opportunities, with both in-person and remote opportunities. The startup says it has matched "tens of thousands" of lawyers with pro bono work around the world. Well, they can now match many, many more! They've just announced an $8m investment, bringing their total investment to over $12m. Terrific to see legal tech products devoted to access to justice get support.

  • Allied Legal Professionals: the US ranks 126th of 139 countries for access to the civil justice system. To help improve this disappointing rating, the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System is hard at work developing a new category of legal jobs to help provide affordable and accessible legal services. People need this. I've watched the licensed legal professional movement for several years, and lamented the end of Washington's LLLT program. I hope IAALS can pump new life into this movement because it would almost certainly help more people get needed legal help. Full press release announcing the program is here (pdf) (hat tip to Nate's News from the Legal Tech Fund).

  • Carl Malamud Interview: one of the most interesting people using technology to improve the legal system is Carl Malamud, who for three decades, has done everything from litigate in the Supreme Court, to digitize texts in India to promote access to knowledge. Listen to this fascinating interview on Law Sites Blog.

  • In your world, summer likely starts with the solstice on June 21. In mine, it starts with the closing of the spring semester and graduation. That time is now. I only publish Lawtomatic regularly during the school year (though reserve the right to do an occasional update!), so I'll be going on hiatus and will plan to write again in the fall. Until then, and as always, drop me a note any time if I can lend you a hand, you have something you want to share, or you'd otherwise like to chat.

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